Saturday

JANUARY 22ND

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HAPPY  BIRTHDAY  EVA  TAYLOR !!!


BIRTHDAYS





1895
Eva Taylor, vocals
b. St. Louis, MO, USA
d. Oct. 31, 1977
~Biography
Eva Taylor was a talented entertainer and Blues singer and was one of the first African-American singers to be heard on radio. She started out as child actor in a traveling revue that toured the world visiting Europe, Australia and New Zealand between 1900 and 1920. In 1920 she moved to New York City, where she became a popular singer in the night clubs of Harlem. 
The following year she married pianist, publisher and producer Clarence Williams. The couple collaborated on many projects, including dozens of songs, a musical revue called "Bottomland", and radio programs. They remained married until Williams' death in 1965. In 1922 Taylor made her first record for the African-American owned Black Swan label, who billed her as "The Dixie Nightingale". She would continue to record dozens of Blues, Jazz and popular sides for Okeh and Columbia thoughout the 1920s and 1930s.
She was the lead singer on several of Williams' classic Blue Five recording dates, including the famous sessions that brought Louis Armstrong and Sidney Bechet together in 1924 and 1925. During the late 1920s Eva had her own radio show on NBC in New York. She retired from show business in the early 1940s, but continued to make occasional concert and night club appearances. The actor Clarence Williams III of Mod Squad fame is Eva and Clarence's grandson.

Eva Taylor (January 22, 1895 - October 31, 1977) was an African American blues singer and stage actress.
Born Irene Joy Gibbons in St. Louis, Missouri, she began singing as a child and toured extensively with the "Josephine Gassman and Her Pickaninnies" vaudeville act. As a young woman, she continued her career in music and eventually met the multi-talented writer and composer Clarence Williams. They married in 1921, and after her husband was hired by Okeh Records, they settled in New York City where she recorded a number of records alone and together with her husband throughout the 1920s and '30s.
Although she adopted the stage name of Eva Taylor, she also worked under her birth name as "Irene Gibbons and her Jazz Band." She was part of the "Charleston Chasers," the name given to a few all-star studio ensembles who recorded between 1925 and 1931. In 1927, Eva Taylor appeared on Broadway in "Bottomland," a musical written and produced by her husband. She retired from the music business in the early 1940s but returned to performing in the late 1960s and early 1970s with tours throughout Europe.


Eva Taylor died of cancer in 1977 in West Hempstead, New York and was interred next to her husband in Saint Charles Cemetery in Farmingdale, Long Island, New York. Their grandson is Clarence Williams III.
1917
Albert J. "Pud" Brown, Reeds
b. Wilmington, DE, USA.
d. May 27, 1996.
Age: 79.
Albert Francis "Pud" Brown (January 22, 1917, Wilmington, Delaware - May 27, 1996, Algiers, Louisiana) was an American jazz reed player.
Though he was born in Delaware, Brown's parents raised him in Shreveport, Louisiana. Brown was fluent on saxophone by age five, and toured throughout North America in a family band at the age of seven. Brown's father, an engineer, built their motor home, a vehicle with a top speed of 25 miles per hour, which they took on tours of circuses, nightclubs, and minstrel shows in the middle of the 1920s.
After moving to Chicago, Brown found work in Phil Lavant's orchestra in 1938 and then in Lawrence Welk's band. In 1941 he married his wife Louise. He returned to Shreveport to run a motorcycle shop, but the endeavor failed, and he relocated once again to Los Angeles. There, he found prolific work as a jazz musician for the next several decades, playing with Les Brown, Coleman Hawkins, Doc Cheatham, Danny Barker, Kid Ory, Percy Humphrey and Louis Armstrong among others. He returned to New Orleans in 1975 and became a mainstay of the local scene there as well. He was a member of Clive Wilson's Original Camelia Brass Band in the 1980s, and a regular at the French Quarter's Palm Court Jazz Cafe until his death.
In addition to performing, Brown was also active as an educator in local schools.

1924
J. J. Johnson, Trombone
b. Indianapolis, IN, USA
d. Feb. 4, 2001, age 77.
né: James Louis JohnsonJ. J. Johnson (born James Louis Johnson) in Indianapolis, Indiana, was a United States jazz trombonist, composer and arranger. He was sometimes credited as Jay Jay Johnson. Johnson was one of the first trombonists to embrace bebop music. He has long been regarded as one of the leading trombonists of the post-swing era, exerting a pervasive influence on other jazz musicians.



1909
"Big" Ed Lewis, Trumpet
b. Eagle City, OK, USA.
d. Sept. 18, 1985
Ed Lewis
• Genre: Jazz
• Instrument: Trumpet
Biography
Ed Lewis had a rather odd career. In his early days he was considered a strong soloist and yet, because of his excellent reading skills and a wide range, he rarely soloed after the early 1930's. Lewis outlived most of his contemporaries and had long periods where he worked very steady but strangely enough his technical skills doomed him to obscurity. Early on he played baritone horn with Jerry Westbrooks' band in Kansas City in 1924 but the following year wisely switched to trumpet.
After brief stints with the groups of Paul Banks and Laura Rucker, Lewis was a key player with the Bennie Moten Orchestra (1926-32) where he was the main trumpet soloist (a bit influenced by Bix Beiderbecke), at least until Hot Lips Page joined the band. After leaving Moten, Lewis was a member of big bands led by Thamon Hayes (1932-34), Harlan Leonard (1934-37) and Jay McShann (1937). Lewis worked with Count Basie's Orchestra for a long stretch (1937-48), appearing on many records but taking virtually no solos; Lewis' one main contribution (other than his stability) was writing "It's Sand, Man!" When the Basie years ended, Lewis worked for a time as a cab driver but from the mid-1950's on he generally led his own lowprofile band in New York. Ed Lewis (who never led his own record date) did emerge a little bit near the end of his life when he toured Europe with the Countsmen in 1984, but he had deserved many more opportunities decades earlier to display his talents.
~ Scott Yanow



1908
Teddy McRae
Tenor Saxophone
b. Philadelphia, PA, USA.
d. Mar. 4, 1999. USA
As important an arranger as he was a tenor-saxophonist, Teddy McRae made important, behind-the-scenes contributions to several bands, most notably Chick Webb's. After playing with local groups, including a family band, McRae worked with June Clark in 1926 and then in 1927 moved to New York where he initially led his own group. Among his musical associations during the next decade were Charlie Johnson, Elmer Snowden (1932), Stuff Smith (1934), Lil Armstrong (1935) and most importantly Chick Webb (1936-39), for whom he contributed both solos and arrangements. McRae remained with Webb's orchestra after the drummer's death, acting as the musical director for a period while the group was fronted by Ella Fitzgerald (1939-41). He had stints with the orchestras of Cab Calloway (1941-42), Jimmie Lunceford (1942), Lionel Hampton (1943) and Louis Armstrong (being his musical director during 1944-45). McRae recorded during the 1930s with small groups headed by Benny Morton, Teddy Wilson and Henry "Red" Allen; wrote "Back Bay Shuffle" for Artie Shaw; and led his own band in 1945. He formed the short-lived Raecox label with Eddie Wilcox (although he never recorded for it) and primarily worked as a freelance arranger thereafter. McRae only recorded a few isolated titles as a leader, including two songs for King in 1945, six for Groove in 1955 (mostly as a vocalist) and two R&Bish vocal numbers for Moonshine in 1958, although he did record with Champion Jack Dupree from 1955-56.
Teddy McRae - Wikipedia
Teddy McRae: 1908-1999
Teddy McRae



1908
Hammie Nixon, harmonica
b. Brownsville, TN, USA.
Nixon helped to pioneer the use of the harmonica as an accompaniment instrument in bands. Orphaned at a young age, he was raised by foster parents. In the 1920s, he began his career as a professional harmonica, kazoo, guitar and jug player. For more than 50 years, he performed with Sleepy John Estes, -first recording with Estes in 1929 for the Victor label. Hammie also recorded with such other groups as Little Buddy Doyle, Lee Green, Charlie Pickett and Son Bonds.
Hammie Nixon was born in 1908, in Brownsville, Tennessee. He began his music career with jug bands in the 1920s and is best known as a country blues harmonica player, but also played the kazoo, guitar and jug. He played with guitarist Sleepy John Estes for half a century, first recording with Estes in 1929 for the Victor label. He also recorded with Little Buddy Doyle, Lee Green, Charlie Pickett and Son Bonds.
During the 1920s Nixon helped to pioneer the use of the harmonica as a rhythm instrument in a band setting, rather than a novelty solo instrument. After Estes died in 1979, Nixon played with the Beale Street Jug Band (also called the Memphis Beale Street Jug Band). Nixon's last recording, "Tappin' That Thing" (Hmg Records), was recorded shortly before his death in 1984.
Hammie Nixon - Wikipedia
Hammie Nixon | AllMusic



1912
Harry Parry
Jazz Clarinet/Saxophone/Vocals/Composer
b. Bangor, Wales, England. d. Oct. 18, 1956.
~by Scott Yanow
A fine trumpeter with an unfortunate nickname, Irving Randolph was never a major name but he was a superior swing stylist. At the beginning of his career, Randolph played with Fate Marable on riverboats and had stints with the territory bands of Walt Farrington (1923-24), Willie Austin, Art Sims, Norman Mason, Floyd Campbell, Alphonse Trent and J. Frank Terry. Randolph played with Andy Kirk's Twelve Clouds of Joy in Kansas City during 1931-33 and then had stints with the orchestras of Fletcher Henderson and Benny Carter in 1934 before spending four years with Cab Calloway (1935-39). Randolph played with the Ella Fitzgerald Orchestra (which was really the Chick Webb ghost band) during 1939-42, was with Don Redman in 1943 and then spent several years (1944-47) with Edmond Hall's combo.
After that period, Randolph worked steadily in a variety of settings into the 1970's (including a long stint with the Chick Morrison Orchestra) but maintained a low profile. Although he recorded with most of the aforementioned groups (including Fletcher Henderson, Benny Carter and Cab Calloway but few significant dates after the mid-1940's), Irving Randolph was never given an opportunity to lead his own session and was largely forgotten by the early 1950's.
Harry Parry...


1909
Irving "Mouse" Randolph, trumpet
b: St. Louis, MO, USA.
d. Dec. 12, 1997, CA, USA.
A fine trumpeter with an unfortunate nickname, Irving Randolph was never a major name but he was a superior swing stylist. At the beginning of his career, Randolph played with Fate Marable on riverboats and had stints with the territory bands of Walt Farrington (1923-24), Willie Austin, Art Sims, Norman Mason, Floyd Campbell, Alphonse Trent and J. Frank Terry. Randolph played with Andy Kirk's Twelve Clouds of Joy in Kansas City during 1931-33 and then had stints with the orchestras of Fletcher Henderson and Benny Carter in 1934 before spending four years with Cab Calloway (1935-39).
Randolph played with the Ella Fitzgerald Orchestra (which was really the Chick Webb ghost band) during 1939-42, was with Don Redman in 1943 and then spent several years (1944-47) with Edmond Hall's combo. After that period, Randolph worked steadily in a variety of settings into the 1970's (including a long stint with the Chick Morrison Orchestra) but maintained a low profile. Although he recorded with most of the aforementioned groups (including Fletcher Henderson, Benny Carter and Cab Calloway but few significant dates after the mid-1940's), Irving Randolph was never given an opportunity to lead his own session and was largely forgotten by the early 1950's. ~ Scott Yanow


1909
Ann Sothern
Actress/vocals
b. Valley City, ND, USA.
d. March 15, 2001, Ketcham, ID (Heart failure, age 92).
née: Harriette Lake. (Her sister, Bonnie Lake, sang with such bands as Jack Jenney and Artie Shaw.) Her businessman father deserted the family when she was about 6, and she was raised by her mother, an opera singer and diction coach. By age 18 she was already acting as an extra in the 'Silents' and was in a very early "soundie" musical film, "The Show of Shows". She made her Broadway debut, as a chorine, in the Florenz Ziegfeld show 'Smiles'. By 1933, she was under contract at Columbia Pictures (studio boss Harry Cohn changed her name to Ann Sothern).
Throughout the 1930s she appeared in many Columbia and RKO musicals, comedies and dramas, including "The Hell Cat," "Eight Bells" and "Smartest Girl in Town." These parts earned the nickname "Queen of the Bs". But in 1939, she starred in the first of what would become a very popular Series of 'Maisie' Films. These films were so profitable for MGM that, when Sothern asked out after No. 6, studio chief Louis B. Mayer said, "Too bad, honey, your pictures pay for our mistakes, so you just stay in 'em." The films became so well known that fans could reach Sothern by addressing their letters to "Maisie, USA." In the 1941 film, "Lady Be Good," the beautiful blonde petite actress with a "zaftig" figure sang the Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein Academy Award-winning song, "The Last Time I Saw Paris."
In 1999, New York's Museum of Modern Art honored her with a retrospective showcasing of 11 of her films, including "Folies Bergere" (1935) with Maurice Chevalier, Joseph L. Mankiewicz's "A Letter to Three Wives", (1949) and the MGM chiller "Shadow on the Wall" (1950). Still, she was to find her broadest audience on television, where she first played Susie, the meddlesome secretary of a talent agent played by Don Porter in "Private Secretary", which ran on CBS from 1953 to 1957.

During 1958 to 1961, she was back at CBS playing assistant hotel manager Katy O'Connor in "The Ann Sothern Show". The late Lucille Ball, an old friend who guest-starred as Lucy Ricardo in the first episode of the Sothern show said "The best comedian in this business, bar none, is Ann Sothern". Sothern earned five Emmy nominations and a Golden Globe for her work on the two shows. Underappreciated by Hollywood, Sothern retired in 1984, moving to Idaho, one of her favorite vacation spots.
In 1987, she told the New York Times "Hollywood doesn't respond to a strong woman, not at all. I was too independent. How dare a woman be competitive or produce her own shows?" At the time she was awaiting the release of "The Whales of August," a story based on an island off the coast of Maine, USA. The tale, that starred Lillian Gish and Bette Davis as two elderly sisters and Sothern as their vivacious neighbor, was about the coming to terms with old age. It was Sothern's first feature film since breaking her back in a stage accident in 1976. Hearing that Sothern had been cast as Gish's best friend Tisha, Davis said: "She's a good actress--she could steal the picture." Of the small cast, only Sothern garnered an Oscar nomination. She made no more films after "Whales." 
Her first marriage, to actor Roger Pryor, ended in divorce in 1942. In 1943, she married actor Robert Sterling, with whom she had a child, the actress Tisha Sterling. She was divorced from Sterling in 1949.







1900
Juan Tizol, trombone/composer
b. San Juan, Puerto Rico
d. April 23, 1984, Inglewood, CA, USA.
né: Vincente Martinez Tizol.
Came to U.S. in 1920 and found work with Bobby Lee's Cotton Pickers and also in How ard Theatre pit band (D.C.) In Sept. 1929, joined the Duke Ellington band staying until 1944. Then played with the Harry James orchestra except for '51-3 when he rejoined Ellington. While with the Ellington band (his most important work), he either wrote alone or in concert with the Duke, such tunes as: "Perdido"; "Pyramid"; "Conga Brava"; "Bakiff"; "Keb-Lah"; "Moonlight Fiesta"; and "Caravan". All through the 1930s, his valve trombone work was an important part of the Ellington band's repertoire.
Juan Tizol
 1908
Melle Weersma
Bandleader/Arranger/composer
b. Harlingen, Netherlands 
The Dutch bandleader and composer arranged for Benny Goodman and Andre Kostelanetz in the ‘30s. He is perhaps best-known for having composed (with Arthur William Halifax) the popular tune “Penny Serenade," which was recorded by Guy Lombardo's band and Nat Gonella, among others.
Weersma studied piano in his youth and played in Dutch and German bands from the mid ‘20s. He formed a group called the Red, White and Blue Aces in 1934. In 1935 he moved to London and arranged for Jack Hylton; later that year he moved to Chicago and worked with Goodman and Kostelanetz.
He lived and worked in Argentina beginning in the late ‘30s, then moved back to the Netherlands after retiring from music.
~ Chris Kelsey




Notable Events Occurring
On This Date Include:



1924.

James Louis ‘J.J.’ Johnson, regarded as the inventor of bebop trombone playing, is born in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.



1965.
"Papa John" Joseph, bass
died in New Orleans, LA, USA.
Age: 87.




1889.
The Columbia Phonograph Company 
was formed in Washington, DC, USA.


Songs Recorded/Released
On This Date Include:



1921





The Happy Six - Yokohama Lullaby (Introducing: "Kentucky")



1924




Paul Whiteman and his Orchestra - Limehouse Blues - (from Andre Charlot's Revue")


1925



Anthony Parenti's Famous Melody Boys - “Cabaret Echoes”

Anthony Parenti's Famous Melody Boys - That's A Plenty



Halfway House Orchestra - Barataria


Halfway House Orchestra - Pussy Cat Rag




John Tobin's Midnight Serenaders - I'm Afraid To Care For You


Bailey's Lucky Seven - Alabamy Bound
  • Why Couldn't It Be Poor Little Me?


Bennie Krueger and his Orchestra

1926


Clarence Williams' Blue Five - I've Found A New Baby - (Jack Palmer / Spencer Williams)
Harry Reser and his Orchestra

1927



Fletcher Henderson Orchestra - Stockholm Stomp
  • Have It Ready

1928



Fred Elizalde and his Anglo American Band - “Shy Anna”


1929



Ben's Bad Boys - Yellow Dog Blues

Zack Whyte and his Chocolate Beau Brummels
  • Mandy (From Shufflin' Along)



Ikey Robinson and his Band - Ready Hokum





Al Starita And The Piccadilly Players - Rhythm King


1930



Georgia Cotton Pickers

Georgia Cotton Pickers - Snag It
  • 12th Street Rag


Waring's Pennsylvanians
  • Without Love


Ambrose And his Orchestra

1934





Cab Calloway and his Orchestra - Jitterbug

Cab Calloway's Jitterbug Party - Wikipedia


LYRICS:

Twelfth Street Rag
Performed by Georgia The Cotton Pickers
~Composed by Euday L. Bowman.
~Lyrics by James S. Sumner.

In a certain city, where the girls are cute and pretty,
They have a raggy, jazzy jazz-time tune.
When you hear that syncopated jazz created melody
You could dance all morning night and noon,
When the slide trombone and moaning saxophone begin to play,
It will make you sad, 'twill make you glad.
Oh boy, what joy,
Burn my clothes for I'm in Heaven, wish I had a million women.
Solomon in all his glory, could have told another story,
Were he but living here today,
With his thousand wives or more, a jazz band on some Egypt shore,
He could dance the night and day away.
I will tell you how they dance
That tantalizing 12th Street Rag.
First you slide, and then you glide, then shimmie for a while;
To the left, then to the right, "Lame Duck," "Get over Sal"
Watch your step then Pirouette, Fox Trot, then squeeze your pal
O-ver you comes stealing such a funny feeling, 'till you feel your senses reeling.
Tantalizing, hypnotizing, mesmerizing strain,
I can't get enough of it, please play it o'er again;
I could dance forever to this refrain,
To that 12th Street, oh you 12th Street Rag.
Jazz-time music is the rage, this is a syncopated age,
ev'ry body loves a jazz-time tune.
For the music captivating, sets your heart a palpitating
You just can't make your feet behave.
Ancients youths of sixty-four, do steps they never did before,
Father time is mad, no one grows old.
Oh boy, what joy,
Put your loving arms around me, say babe, ain't you glad you found me.
Cleopatra on the Nile, could vamp right in the latest style,
If she'd only known this ragtime tune;
Old King Cole a merry soul, called for his pipe and then his bowl,
And the first jazz band his fiddlers three.
Play, oh play me while I dance
That tantalizing 12th Street Rag.
First you slide, and then you glide, then shimmie for a while;
To the left, then to the right, "Lame Duck," "Get over Sal"
Watch your step then Pirouette, Fox Trot, then squeeze your pal
Over you comes stealing such a funny feeling, 'till you feel your senses reeling.
Tantalizing, hypnotizing, mesmerizing strain,
I can't get enough of it, please play it o'er again;
I could dance for ever to this refrain,
To that 12th Street, oh you 12th Street Rag.

TubaGirlFin 
brought to you by... 
~confetta
Special Thanks To: 
The Red Hot Jazz Archives, The Big Band Database
Scott Yanow,
And all those who have provided content, 
images and sound files for this site.